Women are hugely under-represented in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) fields. Whilst there are many complicated reasons behind this, I wanted to showcase some of the talented women in STEM that I have had the pleasure to photograph throughout this project. Ultimately, I believe that if we want to encourage more women to go into the STEM fields, they need to be able to see themselves in those roles.


If you would like to take part, please email me Alex[at]alexanderdavenport.com

Gigi

Gigi is an Engineer currently working for a major multinational company. After graduating with a bachelors of science and engineering from Monash University, Gigi has worked both in Australia and the UK.

Candice

Candice completed a masters of Environment at the University of Melbourne and now works at the Cambridge institute for sustainability leadership, focussing on natural capital and resource sustainability.


Heather

Heather is currently a PhD student at the University of Cambridge in computational physics. After completing her undergraduate degree at the University of Queensland (Australia) in Aerospace Engineering she is now working on developing a new simulation of the plasma layer which forms around spacecraft re-entering earth's atmosphere. The project examines the heat shielding and communications problems during reentry flight. She hopes to continue her work after her PhD in the space industry.

Miriam

Miriam is a research scientist at the University of Cambridge. Miriam specialises in discovering the function of Cytotoxic T cells and how they kill virally infected or cancerous cells.

Dr Claire Ma.

Dr Ma is a clinical research fellow specialising in respiratory medicine. Completing her undergraduate medicine course at the University of Cambridge she is now working towards gaining her PhD in cell biology.

Christina

Christina is a scientist in the Dept of Pathology at the University of Cambridge. She works on the Regulatory cells of the Immune system, the cells that keep our bodies from mounting an over active immune response.